Tag Archives: accommodations

All Are Welcome

“All Are Welcome” is a well-known and well-loved Christian hymn written by prolific liturgical composer, Marty Haugen. I’ve sung it often as a member of the congregation and even led it as a cantor on a few occasions, but never did the song impact me in the way it did this past Sunday when visiting St. John Chrysostom in Wallingford, PA.

This was not my first visit to St. John Chrysostom. I wrote a piece several years ago, called “Welcoming the Visitor”. My family and I had attended a Mass at the church at Eastertime while visiting our oldest son at Swarthmore College. I was so overwhelmed with their intentional inclusion, I wrote a story and connected with the pastor, Fr. Hallinan by email.

More than a year after my son has graduated from Swarthmore, I found myself preparing to bring our youngest son to the school for an official visit on campus. I happily anticipated an opportunity to attend church once again at St. John Chrysostom…I was not disappointed.

The moment I walked in, about ten minutes before the start of Mass, I observed several people with various kinds of disabilities. Ushers and members of the congregation greeted everyone in a kind and gentle way, expressing their joy to see them. One young adult, who seemed to be non-verbal, shook hands very enthusiastically with the greeter, a huge smile on his face. It was obvious to me that he was a valued member of the congregation and everyone he encountered was as glad to see him as he was to see them.

A few more steps into the church and I noticed some signage; one an announcement about a Caregivers Support Group and another about an Autism help line. These notices were not buried among many on a full bulletin board, but prominently displayed and easy to read.

I finally found a seat in the pew and listened to the choir warm up (a folk group with guitars, bongos and several singers.)  Of the six vocalists, the soloist chosen to lead a prominent part of one of the songs was an elderly woman with an exceptionally quiet voice. She was singing in tune, but it struck me as particularly refreshing that she was the one chosen for the solo. Not the strongest or the youngest voice, but an important voice and another obvious way that this church embraces the gifts of every person.

I could go on but you probably get the idea. St. John Chrysostom is a vibrant congregation with a strong understanding of what it takes to be inclusive.

I waited a few minutes at the end of Mass so I could re-introduce myself to Fr. Hallinan and hopefully get a few minutes to talk. We ended up chatting for more than ten minutes about our shared passion for inclusion and concluded our time together with a photo (thank you for that, Fr. Hallinan!). I expressed how grateful I was for all that this church does to promote inclusion and headed out the door.

As I got back in my car to head back to the campus baseball field, one of the points from my conversation with Fr. Hallinan that resonated strongly with me kept running through my mind.  St. John Chrysostom, like many other faith communities around the country, holds a designated service especially for individuals and families affected by disability. The “Mass of Welcoming and Inclusion”, as it is called at St. John Chrysostom is celebrated the 1st Sunday of the month. (The Mass I attended, by the way, was not on the 1st Sunday of the month, it was a regular Mass without this distinction) Fr. Hallinan said that his goal is that eventually they would not need to have the Welcoming and Inclusion Mass, that all Masses would feel welcoming and inclusive! We both agreed that an inclusive service can really be a helpful stepping stone for congregations and is still important for some individual and families affected by disability.  I couldn’t help but think, however, as I left the church, that if any congregation was nearing the goal of letting go of this kind of stepping stone, it was this church.

“All Are Welcome” at St. John Chrysostom, that is for sure in both obvious and subtle ways. I am grateful for their efforts and appreciate the opportunity to be an occasional visitor. I also know that there are many Hampton Roads local faith communities doing equally awesome inclusion work and seeing great results. If you aren’t already connected with FIN, please do share with us what you are doing. Your efforts could really be an encouragement to someone else or another faith community.

God Bless.

Karen j.

Essay Contest: Blog #4 Brittany French

Brittany was one of the first people that befriended me many years ago when my daughter and I started attending The Chosen Ministry. In her shy way, she would ask about Samantha and then about me, always remembering details that many would miss if they weren’t really listening. What a gift!

FIN would like to both thank and congratulate Brittany for sharing her story and being the winner of our very first essay contest.  As you read her essay you will realize that the remarkable thing about this story is how simple it really is…a church doing what many others do; reach out to the community and educate children in the faith.  What made a difference in Brittany’s life is how she felt and the continued acceptance as a person with a disability as she grew up in the church.  Even more wonderful, being a member of the congregation eventually led to finding a job nearby.  Wouldn’t it be wonderful if more adults with disabilities were able to find work through the natural connections we make in our congregations?

So again we thank you, Brittany for not only writing this essay, but presenting it at our Gifts of the Heart Gala on March 11. You did a great job! -K. Jackson

My Faith Journey

Author Brittany French with Karen Fox who leads The Chosen Ministry in Norfolk

by Brittany French

The hospitality of a neighbor inviting me to church and the hospitality of the church folk accepted me even though I have several disabilities and this changed my life forever. I was three years old when a neighbor invited my twin sister and me to attend Sunday School at a church down the street from my house. My twin sister does not have the intellectual and physical disabilities that I live with every day. I began this adventure in the classroom with two wonderful teachers that made me feel loved and wanted.

In Sunday School we did arts and crafts related to Bible stories, we memorized verses and sat on a rug to hear the bible story of the day. My favorite event at church was attending Vacation Bible School in the summer. I loved playing outside and being with the other children. The other children did not treat me differently because of my disability. That made me feel good. I was always accepted for who I was. In fact, my church has five people with disabilities in the congregation because this church accepts and welcomes all people who come in.

Throughout the years, I continued to go to Sunday School each week. My faith grew stronger as I grew older and began to understand what the bible stories were saying. As an adult I joined the church I had been going to for so many years. This was a place I was accepted as God’s child, made in his image. I am what God wanted me to be. The church has helped me accept my disabilities and believe in myself.

I now have also joined “Chosen Ministry” which is a group that works with intellectually disabled adults. I love having other disabled friends. They understand some of the challenges I face. Being a part of “Chosen Ministry” has helped me see my disabilities in a different way. I am grateful to be who I am.

After several years of looking for a job, and many hours of prayer, I got a job in the daycare center which is next door to my church. Knowing that I am helping others is an answer to my prayers. My faith continues to grow as I work with little children and see how they love everyone.

Note: Brittany attends Third Presbyterian Church in Norfolk, VA

Brittany with friend Angela West at the Gifts of the Heart Gala-2018

 

My New Ramp

For the last ten years I have been a public advocate in the disability community, learning about inclusion and sharing that information with faith communities, hopefully raising awareness about the need to be more welcoming to individuals and families affected by disability. During the course of this work, I have made many friends, some of them very close friends now, who use wheelchairs.  For the last few years, I have made sure that I borrowed or rented a ramp in December so that I could invite my friends who use wheelchairs to a Christmas open-house party in my home.

A few weeks ago, faced with preparations for this year’s open house, I made a decision.  I just went ahead and purchased a ramp. It is not a huge one, as you can see in the photo, but it serves its purpose. I was so excited about my new ramp, that I invited one of my best friends to come to dinner to try it out.

I was thrilled that my friend could come over-just a simple supper with my kids and I. We took advantage of the time to catch up and share family stories. It was a wonderful evening.

Before you think, “isn’t that a nice thing to do”, let me confess that I am actually pretty embarrassed and disappointed in myself.  I am embarrassed that as someone who helps advocate for persons affected by disability it took me so long to ensure that my own home was accessible, at least to the degree that someone in a wheelchair could get into my home.

Even though it is hard to admit all this, I am sharing this story because I have made an important realization. Being a person that has full use of my legs, I take for granted that I can go pretty much wherever I want I can get in and out of all buildings, public and private. There are no barriers for me.  These statements are obvious, I know. Yet despite my years getting to know all kinds of people affected by disability, it is still hard to remember that something as simple as a ramp can make a huge difference in someone’s life.

My friends that need to use a wheelchair to get around-they live in a world full of barriers. One of their frustrations is probably not being able to do something as common as visit a friend in their home.  While I cannot make up for the years it took me to wake up and realize I needed to purchase my own ramp, I am rejoicing today. My spirit is soaring, truth be told, for the joy I felt being able to welcome my good friend into my home for dinner.  And the thought that we will share many more dinners in the future.

As I write this story on my porch with my recently purchased ramp in front of me, I wonder…what if every single building, from public building to private homes, where automatically built with wheelchair ramps? What if, having struck up a friendship with someone who uses a wheelchair, you didn’t have to think twice about inviting them over to you house? What if the terminology “accessibility” became obsolete because every place was easily accessed for persons who use wheelchairs or need some other kind of accommodation? Big dreams, I know. But maybe someone reading this, someone like me, will decide they want to get a ramp too. That would be a good start…

Happy Birthday to the Happy Hour Class

Today I had the privilege of attending worship service at Wesley Grace United Methodist Church, http://www.wmumcnor.org/ a small congregation in the Wards Corner area of Norfolk, VA that is known locally for a lot of community outreach, impacting the local area in many positive ways.

I was invited by my friend, Gray Puryear, who is not only a longstanding member of the congregation but also serves as a lay speaker among the many responsibilities he holds at Wesley Grace.

Gray, who I have known for 10 years as he is a founding board member of Faith Inclusion Network, invited me to this service because they were planning to celebrate an exciting milestone, the 50th anniversary of a ministry for adults with intellectual disabilities they call “Happy Hour Class”.

An excerpt from a description in the bulletin about the ministry reads, “In 1967, several parents attending a church t Wards Corner in Norfolk asked the church leadership to start a Sunday School class for their adult children with intellectual disabilities. No one in the church had any training or experience with working with this special population in an educational setting, but a few members of the laity gave it a try…Today, 50 years later, that class is recognized by the Virginia Conference of the United Methodist Church as the oldest continuous class for adults with intellectual disabilities in Virginia.”

I was unexpectedly emotional during the service and have tried to piece together why that might be.  Part of it, I expect, was the very familiar setting of the UMC. I was raised in a small Methodist church, much like this one and the warm memories of a close-knit community were close to the surface.  But it was more than that.

The congregation had a special air of welcoming as they began this celebratory time of worship.  Quite a few people greeted my daughter Samantha and I warmly, recognizing she has a disability.  I felt like members of the congregation were especially aware, on this day set aside to recognize the Happy Hour Class Ministry, that a person they did not know who has a disability was visiting for the first time. It was very welcoming and even encouraging.

The service was full of evidence that this was an important day; a large banner was dedicated to commemorating the 50th anniversary and every part of the service included members of the Happy Hour Class from the greeters, to acolytes and musicians. The theme of celebration was obvious and happily contagious.

Gray Puryear, Lay Speaker at Wesley Grace UMC and one of leaders of the Happy Hour Class

I was also quite moved by my friend Gray’s sermons both to the children and the adults.  His basket of different kinds of apples, an illustration of how people are all different yet still all apples, was simple yet effective for the children. His message in the sermon was equally clear. Referencing Exodus and the story of Moses telling God that he was “slow of speech” so he couldn’t possibly be God’s spokesperson, Gray pointed out an important point.  Just as God provided an accommodation in appointing Moses’ brother Aaron to help Moses, we too are called to provide accommodations to help each other. As Gray put it, “when we provide an accommodation for a person with a disability, we are acting in the image of God.

The beautiful service, complete not only with some contemporary worship music but also a song I have not sung since childhood, Jesus Loves Me, was thoughtfully organized. Even their special guest from Richmond, Ms. Cheryl Edley-Worford, Director of Inclusivity and Lay Leadership Excellence in the Virginia Conference of the UMC https://vaumc.org/LayLeadership was on hand to offer her congratulations and gifts to the congregation.

As Samantha and I left Wesley Grace UMC today, I was reminded that it is the small, thoughtful efforts that sometimes add up to make a big impact for the congregation and their visitors. Listening devices, a screen with large print of all songs and prayers, friends helping friends with walkers and wheelchairs, a clear message from the leadership preaching inclusion and acceptance and the inclusion of persons affected by disability in all parts of the services, make for a welcoming environment. In my eyes, these accommodations and attitudes of acceptance all added up to Faith Inclusion Network’s vision to Accept, Include, and Celebrate all persons affected by disability in our faith communities.

Congratulations and thank you to members of Wesley Grace UMC, Gray Puryear, and Pastor, Scott Beck on this special anniversary.

God Bless!

Autism Moms and Dads Blog Series-Interview #5

 

I “met” Dave a few years ago by phone and was struck by the similarities of our parenting experience, having daughters very close in age.  My family is also Catholic and has worked hard to include our daughter into the life of our local parish and teach her about the Catholic faith. After talking with Dave, I once again realized how important connecting with other parents can be, even if they are in another part of the country.  If you would like to keep up with Dave and his beautiful daughter, Danielle, take a look at their Facebook page, Autism with the Rizzos at https://www.facebook.com/Autism-With-The-Rizzos-281489198616138/

Also, I highly recommend  David’s book,  Faith, Family and Children with Special Needs; Spiritually Able http://www.loyolapress.com/products/books/family-life-and-parenting/faith-family-and-children-with-special-needs and the The Adaptive First Eucharist Preparation Kit https://www.loyolapress.com/products/special-needs/adaptive-learning/adaptive-first-eucharist-preparation-kit , which he helped develop. Both of these are wonderful resources for helping to teach the Catholic faith to persons who have autism.

Interview #5 Dave Rizzo

 

Question: How old was your child when they were diagnosed with autism? Can you share how you felt when you received that diagnosis?

Dave: Danielle was four years old when she was diagnosed with autism.  My wife and I knew something was up before this and we feared it was autism, but the formal diagnosis from a doctor didn’t come till Danielle was four.  The diagnostic process seemed endless. There were surveys we had to fill out, early intervention sessions, meetings with doctors and therapists.  When the formal diagnosis did come I felt a combination of intense dread and sadness, coupled with relief that at last I knew for sure what was going on with my daughter. The sadness came from the realization that the life I had imagined for her up to this point would not be the life she would lead, things like that I would never walk her down the aisle at her wedding, or that she would not go to college or lead an independent life. 

Question: How has living with autism affected your family? (immediate or extended)

Dave: It affected my family in a big way.  Raising a child with autism leads to a fundamental shift in family dynamics.  We had to arrange our family life around keeping Danielle safe, providing therapies, helping her with everything.  We had to give most of our time to Danielle and this sometimes meant not giving equal time to our three other children. I felt very isolated in those early years.  It took a while for us all to learn how we could be a family of a child with autism and balance all the competing demands.  Eventually we learned how to do this better.

 QuestionWhat is currently your biggest challenge as an autism dad?

Dave: We just went through the process of attaining guardianship for Danielle, who turned 18 last autumn.  It was very difficult hearing her declared a mentally incapacitated individual.  We don’t think of her that way.  We think of all the marvelous things she has learned to do, all her accomplishments, the way she has brought joy into our lives and in the lives of others.  It’s also still a challenge to see other children her age meeting milestones and typical rites of passage like learning how to drive.

 Question: What is currently your greatest joy as an autism dad?

Dave: Seeing how Danielle has grown into a fun loving person, who continues to spread joy to those she meets.  For me, I experience a special joy when I see Danielle at Mass participating with reverence, folding her hands in prayer, reaching out during the sign of peace, kneeling in prayer after receiving holy communion. 

 Question: Has autism affected your faith? If yes, how so?

Dave: Having a child with autism forced me to grapple with my faith and turn toward God in prayer and sacrament.  My faith became much more visual and experiential, as I tried to connect with both God and my daughter.  I have learned that the life I imagined was not exactly the life God had in store for me.  But I am trying to discover in my life that the action of God is unfolding the way it should, that the life God has in store for me and my family is a good life.

 Question: Is there anything else you would like to share about being an autism dad?

Dave: Yes.  I want people to know that it is a life changing experience, and a roller coaster of a ride.  As the father of a now young adult with autism I have learned to look at the world a little differently.  I make a lot of mistakes along the way, and it is often very hard. However, mostly things are good.  There is happiness, humor, sadness, exasperation, compassion, love, and all the emotions you can possibly imagine, but life is about all of these feelings, and always has been. 

 

 

A Call to Encouragement

Last Thursday evening over sixty people from our community gathered at Second Presbyterian Church, Norfolk to support FIN and learn more about the current work and vision of our growing organization. Beginning our 10th year, this is an important and exciting time in the development of our small non-profit, working towards our dream of making the congregations of Hampton Roads the most inclusive and welcoming in the country-envisioning a world where all people affected by disability are accepted, included and celebrated in our faith communities.  Many, many thanks to members of Second Pres., volunteers and supporters who made the reception a wonderful first time event.

In the wake of this successful gathering however, I began to feel extremely overwhelmed.  There is so much work to be done; challenges of time, finances and the daunting task of helping our community in general understand what FIN is about seem almost insurmountable.  I needed to take a moment or two to understand what God was doing with all of this…and so I turned to my Bible.

Members of FIN Clergy Council: Catherine Monroe, Jack Howell, Michael Panitz, Craig Wansink, Wendy Wilkinson and Michael Daniels

Members of FIN Clergy Council: Assoc. Pastor Catherine Monroe, Pastor Jack Howell, Rabbi Michael Panitz, Pastors Craig Wansink, Wendy Wilkinson and Michael Daniels

I found myself in the book of Nehemiah.  It had been a long time since I had read about Nehemiah’s quest to rebuild the wall around Jerusalem, and I was reminded that it didn’t exactly go so smoothly for him.  Workers got tired and discouraged, and were even threatened by those that opposed building the wall.  Although the challenges of building FIN are obviously very different, Nehemiah’s words jumped out of the page for me: “Don’t be afraid of them, Remember the Lord, who is great and awesome…” Oh yes, my heart agreed, God is both great and He is awesome. Just the other evening, FIN board member Pamela Tanner was talking with a guest at the reception and shared, “What I love about FIN is that it is a God thing…we certainly couldn’t have come this far without God.” I couldn’t agree more.

I also related to Nehemiah’s words in Chapter 4:19-20: “The work is extensive and spread out, and we are widely separated from each other along the wall. Wherever you hear the sound of the trumpet, join us there. Our God will fight for us!”  I immediately related to that idea, and thought that maybe FIN is called to be that trumpet. We go out into our faith communities, many working hard to diligently embrace the work of inclusion of people with disabilities in our congregations, yet we can feel alone in our efforts sometimes.  FIN’s events, whether they be receptions, workshops or conferences, herald the opportunity to come together to learn from, support and encourage one another.  We are stronger together and our God will fight for us and with us!

As FIN moves forward, I ask that you consider three ways to support our efforts and work in the community.  All of them are equally important.

  1. Share. Use our Facebook pages, share emails, tell your acquaintances, friends and co-workers that there is an important effort building in our community; an effort to ensure ALL people are welcomed and accommodated in our faith communities, an effort to ensure that all people have the opportunity to worship and be an active part of our congregations.    https://www.facebook.com/FINhamptonroads/ and https://www.facebook.com/ThatAllMayWorship/
  2. Become a member. Visit the membership page and choose one of our four membership circles. http://www.faithinclusionnetwork.org/memberships/
  3. Pray. As an organization based on faith, we do not underestimate the power of your prayers. Please pray for our efforts to raise awareness, educate and connect our community.

Thank you and hope to see you at our signature event this year, That All May Worship-2017 Pathways to Powerful Inclusion Conference on Friday, March 10 at Church of the Holy Family, VB- https://thatallmayworship-2017.eventbrite.com

 

 

It’s All About Attitude

Over the last few years, it has been well stated by advocates of the faith and disability community that significant barriers can and do exist in faith communities.  The barriers not only make it difficult for persons with disabilities to be included but result in unwelcoming and inaccessible places of worship. “If there are barriers of attitude, communication or architecture for anyone, the foundation of the House of God is weakened.”-That All May Worship, An Interfaith Welcome to People with Disabilities, page 5, http://www.aapd.com/what-we-do/interfaith/that-all-may-worship/that-all-may-worship.pdf .

Architectural barriers, such as limited or non-existent wheelchair accessibility are obvious.  If one cannot get into a building or does not have access to certain parts of a building, the message is clear: “You are not welcome”.  But physical barriers can be less obvious as well.  A church might have a ramp to the front door but the door is very heavy and difficult to open.  Although a greeter may be assigned during regular service times, what about small meetings during the weekday?  An inaccessible door like this could still be a barrier, communicating to the person using a wheelchair: “You are welcome to our worship service but we don’t necessarily want or even recognize your desire to participate in other activities or ministries of our community.”  An automatic door might be a solution here-giving independent access to the building.

Barriers of communication are also obvious but often overlooked.  These include providing alternative forms of communicating such as an ASL Interpreter, a Looping System, C.A.R.T. (Communication Access in Real-time Translation), large print materials or Braille materials.  If a person has a condition that affects their sight or hearing, they will need these kinds of accommodations.  Important to note; if your place of worship does not have these accommodations in place, a person needing them will not usually visit. The stance, “We don’t have anyone with these kinds of disabilities here so we don’t need to provide accommodations” therefore, is useless and most uninviting.

It is also worth considering communication accommodations for persons with developmental or intellectual disabilities.  Using visuals (for example providing a picture schedule for the order of the service) would be a way to bridge the communication gap with people who might find it difficult to follow along without visual cues.

But when it comes to barriers, attitude is by far the most difficult for congregations to address.  The attitude of people in the congregation, the governing body of the faith community and the administration can directly influence how a person or family affected by disability feels when coming to a place of worship.  The examples are endless, but let’s look at one:

A family with a young child with autism visits a church for the first time.  The family is cautious, feeling a bit awkward because, 1. They know their 8 year old has some typical autistic behaviors that make it a challenge to stay confined for a full hour service and 2. They have had bad experiences in the past trying to make worship work.

But they are here, at your church, trying again.

All seems to go well until about 15 minutes into the service when the child who has autism starts up, wiggling and laughing too loud, finally belting out a loud “ahhhhh…” in response to an unknown stimuli.

Other members of the congregation turn around and stare.  One mother, sitting with three well behaved children, rolls her eyes and whispers to her husband.

The family, now mortified, gets up and leaves…and they don’t come back.

Before you think, “This would never happen in my place of worship”, think again.  Research out of Vanderbilt University concluded that 70% of parents of children with disabilities would find disability awareness efforts, over any other accommodations, the most helpful.  As stated in Welcoming People with Developmental Disabilities and their Families: A Practical Guide for Congregations, written by Erik Carter, Courtney Taylor, Thomas Boehm, Naomi Annandale, and Aimee Logeman,

“Parents considered congregation-wide disability awareness to be among the most helpful efforts faith communities could undertake. Why is it so important to foster awareness and understanding of disability? Often, the biggest barrier people with disabilities and their families encounter are not inaccessible stairs, but unwelcoming stares.” http://vkc.mc.vanderbilt.edu/assets/files/resources/CongregationPracticeGuide.pdf

When it comes to barriers however, I offer up the following: Attitude is the only real barrier to full inclusion. Let me explain with an example.

A FIN friend of mine who lost her hearing as an adult and was looking for a place to worship.  She wanted to attend a large local church but needed some accommodations.  So my friend contacted the church, asking if they might provide C.A.R.T. for just two services per month.  (Communication in Real-time Translation-someone types what is being said in real time and this is projected on a screen).

The response from the church was almost immediate: “We asked our pastor and administration about this request and we are sorry that we cannot provide this type of accommodation at this time.  The cost is prohibitive since it is only needed for one person.”

Although the barrier to participation in worship here is clearly one of communication, the overlying barrier is one of attitude.  Because of the quick response, it was obvious that this request did not go beyond the front office.  There was no offer to meet with my friend, bring this suggestion to the governing body of the church for discussion or even investigate possible ways to make raise funds.  Because she was just one person making the request, the church administration did not see the need to further consider the use of C.A.R.T. or consider ways to provide this needed accommodation.

This attitude barrier could apply in any situation where funding is needed for making buildings or worship services more accessible.  A few people from a large, wealthy church in our area advocated for over a year to provide funds for an elevator to the second floor.  Although the worship services all take place on the ground level, the second floor remained off limits to a teenage who uses a wheelchair and wanted to be a part of the youth group class.  Although the church (and good for them!) temporarily moved the class to the one small available classroom on the first floor, it made the teen feel bad.  He did not want the whole class moved just for him-all the other children where upstairs in the more spacious classrooms.

Happily, the advocacy work, combined with an open and accepting attitude prevailed and a much needed elevator was eventually built.  With some education and awareness, the attitude of the congregation changed and funds were allocated for the project.  Several months after the elevator was installed, another family with a child who uses a wheelchair joined the church.  Imagine that!

All in all, my experience through FIN is that attitudes are changing and faith communities are moving toward positive inclusive efforts.  In our own local Hampton Roads community, more and more places of worship are beginning disability ministry efforts and programs.  In September and October alone, I and other members of the FIN Board of Directors have given presentations for six different faith communities and organizations, sharing ideas for inclusion and the mission of FIN-“to better include people with disabilities into faith communities.”  Barriers are being knocked down and attitudes are changing. Is your faith community ready to embrace an attitude of inclusion?  Let us know how we can help.  Join FIN and the faith and disabilities movement and get involved!

 

To reprint this article for distribution in your faith community or to request a presentation, contact Karen Jackson at faithinclusionnetwork@gmail.com

FIN Presentation Topics

 

1. “It’s All About Attitude!”- Introduction to disability inclusion in faith communities

2. “Inclusion 101”-Ideas for inclusion into religious education

3.  Disability Awareness presentations for children and teens

4. Contact us to customize a presentation that would meet the needs of your faith community