Category Archives: Autism

Lead with Love

If you have a disability or are the parent or guardian of someone with a disability, then you are very familiar with assessments for eligibility of services. These assessments are designed to identify whether  or not an individual requires support of some kind which would then lead to the kinds of intervention or available services. Assessments can be just a few minutes long or take hours and hours and require you to answer hundreds of questions.

As the parent of a young adult with severe autism, I have sat through my fair share of assessments and can assure you that they usually are not fun. This is mainly because the whole reason for the questions is to determine what my child can not do, what her weaknesses are, and why she needs support for daily living, etc.

No one wants to have to spend time focusing solely on their child’s weaknesses, because, despite the truth off all the information, this does not define our child, it is just a part of who they are. Unfortunately, it is the only part that is usually relevant during an assessment.

Recently, this idea of assessments came to mind when consulting with a local small church. I met with a very kind group of people who wanted to discuss how best to support a young person with severe autism. This is the kind of situation I get calls and emails about most frequently as Director of FIN. Due to the challenging behaviors, people leading religious education programs, Sunday schools and other children-focused ministries in churches and synagogues are often at a loss as to how best to include children with autism.

Discussing the situation of inclusion for a young child with autism always brings me back to when my daughter was nine years old. We had just started attending a new church and I was working with the director of the religious education program on how to understand and include Samantha. Even though this was over 10 years ago, I remember it like it was yesterday. Do you know what sticks out most in my mind? The initial response from the director of RE. She didn’t ask about all the challenges and how we were going to accomplish including Samantha into Sunday school classses, she just said, “We will figure it out” and asssured me that the church would help. She asked me what Samantha liked to do and what she was like at home. I felt that Samantha was going to be loved and appreciated because of those questions, and I was right.  

The small group I was asked to join was assembled to address and develop strategies to include the child with autism. I have no doubt that they too want what is best for this child and family, as well as the congregation as a whole. I arrived with a small stack of books, resources from some of my favorite authors like Barb Newman, Jolene Philo and Shelly Christensen who have detailed suggestions as to how best to develop support and develop a positive inclusive environment. I brought along some Joni and Friends resources too and I threw in David Morstad’s latest book, “Whole Community” for a big picture look at the importance of developing inclusion.

It was an informal meeting and the group leader jumped right in with some ideas they had been thinking about and the conversation they wanted to have with the parents. As I listened to all their suggestions, it occurred to me that this well-intentioned meeting felt like a group that was assessing and solving a problem, much like the assessments I go through with my daughter to receive services.

Eventually, I chimed in with the suggestion that we back up to the initial talk with the child’s parents. How would I feel if members of my church started a conversation about my daughter with questions about her weaknesses, about the challenges and how to address them in the Sunday school class? I am pretty sure it would feel like an assessment. What is wrong? What are the weaknesses? How do we fix it or what do we provide to make this work?

I made the suggestion that perhaps they could start by asking the parents what their child’s strengths were? What does he do well? What does he like? Yes, the challenging behaviors do exist and need to be discussed to find a way to best support and include the child, but this young person is first and foremost a child of God, with their own set of gifts to offer the community.

The suggestion was noted and appreciated, I think. The group was a well-educated, smart and loving group of people who are all interested in what is best for this individual child, family and the rest of their children in the congregation too. I was glad to be a part of the conversation and hopefully had some good suggestions and helpful resources.

But what I came away with personally was an important reminder of what I believe we all must remember as we go about the work of developing supports and inclusion in our faith communities for people with disabilities or special needs. In addition to learning and utilizing best practice strategies to help our children be included in congregational activities, which very often means religious education classes, we must always start by seeing the person as a precious child of God, a person that brings their own gifts, talents, and special qualities to the table…and we must keep in mind how loved that individual is by their family and by God. We must lead with love.

 

“Julia” and Autism Awareness and Acceptance Month

When you are part of a family who has a member with Autism, the month of April is going to mean something to you. You may be the person who embraces Autism Awareness and Acceptance month, sharing everything on Facebook that you see or maybe you have an opposite reaction and can’t help but feel a bit weary of the need to constantly promote awareness. 

But whether you have strong feelings one way or the other or are ambivalent about the whole idea, the world (yes, the entire world) has embraced April as Autism Awareness and Acceptance Month and I believe it is here to stay.

With that in mind, I began a very intentional Facebook campaign in April on our Faith Inclusion Network Facebook page. My goal was to take 30 separate photos of individuals, families, businesses, faith communities and other organization representatives that are involved with FIN and somehow, either directly or indirectly, support individuals affected by autism. My ambitious goal was to post every day throughout April.  What I needed, however, was something fun to add in the mix.

“Julia” at taping of interview with Eggleston Services on WNIS 790

That is where “Julia” came in. Julia is the fairly new Muppet on Sesame Street that has Autism. The introduction of this character was highly praised by most of the Autism community a few years ago. I was thrilled when I learned about her, not only because I appreciated that Sesame Street was including a friend that has Autism,  but because Julia is a girl, and there are not as many girls on the Spectrum as boys.

So, I began my quest, emailing and seeking out FIN friends willing to pose

Karen Jackson and daughter Samantha

with Julia. She lived in the car with me and for weeks we traveled around the area to synagogues, churches, homes and businesses, posing inside, outside or wherever it worked. I joked with friends that I really didn’t realize how time-intensive this project would be but I  enjoyed the whole experience immensely.

There were several surprises that made my quest with Julia so joyful and positive. The first was that everyone, and I mean everyone, adored this little toy character. Julia somehow brought a huge smile to everyone’s face immediately, adult or child, big or little, even if people didn’t know who she was at first, they seemed to love her right away.

The second surprise was the encouragement I received from everyone who I was able to photograph. A hug, a few kind words, it all energized me and made me feel very grateful to be a part of this community. In fact today, I took the photo of Rabbi Panitz at Temple Israel, which was a particularly adorable picture with him posing with Julia and a toy Torah. We didn’t have much time as we both had to get to other places, but his words right before I left; “I’m so glad that we’re friends”, are still

Rabbi Michael Panitz of Temple Israel, Norfolk

reverberating in my mind, a reminder that I have made some long-lasting and important relationships in my work with FIN.

As I look back over all of the photos of FIN friends and supporters, I am struck by another and maybe the most important aspect of this little Facebook project. Inclusion is not only relevant in our society today; inclusion is absolutely vital to making our communities the best they can be. Julia strikes a happy chord with so many, I believe, because she serves as a reminder of simple childhood joy and the acceptance of all people, regardless of disability, diagnosis or any other “difference” that makes them stand out. We want the “Julias” of our community to be well-known and well-loved, and I believe there is a lot of love and support out there. But I am not naive. I also realize that not everyone has positive inclusive experiences, whether in faith communities or any other places they venture to go. That is the work that FIN and other organizations in our community undertake every day.  Until everyone in our communities feels loved and included, we will keep working.  

Many thanks to Julia, Sesame Street and all those who took a few moments out of their day to smile with me. Keep up the good work!

Blessings,

Karen Jackson

 

 

 

 

Acceptance

“I’m a bit nervous”, I confessed to my husband as I prepared for my speaking engagement at Temple Israel in Norfolk, VA.  Despite the friendship, support and encouragement I have received from Rabbi Michael Panitz over the past 10 years as I worked to start and develop Faith Inclusion Network, I had actually never been asked to speak there or for any other local Jewish congregations.  Would they really be interested in hearing some of my story? Would they accept and welcome me, a Catholic Christian, to be a part of their service?

I prepped my daughter’s caretaker and headed over in plenty of time to hear some of the beginning of Temple Israel’s Disabilities Awareness Shabbat. February is designated as Jewish Disability, Awareness, Acceptance and Inclusion Month in our country and I had been asked to share a few words about inclusion as both a parent of child with a disability and the leader of Faith Inclusion Network.

When I arrived at Temple Israel, I was immediately greeted by a friend I already knew from the disability community; a mom who shares a similar parenting journey. Others I didn’t know smiled warmly, offering words of welcome and I immediately relaxed.

My short talk was titled, “Acceptance”, a word that was recently added to the national Jewish inclusion effort for their 10-year anniversary. Jewish Disability Awareness, Acceptance and Inclusion month is celebrated and experienced around the country, due to the efforts of people like Shelly Christensen, one of the founders of this effort and also one of Faith Inclusion Network’s national board advisers.

Karen Jackson and Claudia Mazur

It didn’t take long for me to recognize that the Temple Israel congregation is a very accepting community. People with various types of disabilities dotted the congregation and several individuals affected by disability participated by leading prayers during this Disability Awareness Shabbat. It did not escape my notice that the congregation was also very accepting of me, a guest to their worship time.

After the service I joined members of the congregation for lunch, sharing stories with a few other parents who have children with disabilities. The word “acceptance” floated in and out of our conversations. The feeling of community was strong and encouraging.

Rabbi Michael Panitz and K. Jackson

More than ten years ago, I reached out to many people in the Hampton Roads community, including Rabbi Panitz, to ask the question, “What can be done to make our faith communities more inclusive?” The answer is reinforced again and again in the opportunities I have had to visit and speak with congregations, sharing and listening to stories of welcoming and acceptance. We can all make a difference with inclusion efforts when we begin by being open and accepting of people who may be different in some way. Acceptance is the first step towards inclusion.

Thank you to Temple Israel for your kind invitation and welcome, your understanding and demonstration of inclusion and for choosing to accept individuals and families affected by disability.

Shalom.

Karen j.

A Christmas Extravaganza

As most people are aware who know me through FIN and the disability community, my daughter Samantha is severely affected by autism. The past couple of years especially, have been a struggle as we help her through some challenging anxiety and medically related issues. For Samantha and many other people in our community with severe developmental disabilities, it can be very difficult to participate in community events and gatherings. Instead of risking a meltdown or maybe not even being able to get in the door because of anxiety, we opt to stay home.

Yet the social, community-loving person in me never gives up and I am grateful to the many organizations and faith communities in Hampton Roads that are striving to be welcoming, understanding and inclusive, making it easier to participate in the community.  From organizations like Virginia Stage Company that is offering a sensory-friendly performance this week (Theater for Everyone-Wed. Dec. 12) for people with disabilities and their families, to faith communities who intentionally welcome and celebrate people families affected by disability, I sense a developing tide of awareness in our community. I share the following story to encourage all who are working hard to develop awareness and provide opportunities to support individuals and families affected by disability. Thank you and God bless!

Karen Jackson,

Executive Director, Faith Inclusion Network

A Christmas Extravaganza

The other night, my daughter and I attended a beautiful gathering put on by the youth of Grace Community Church (EY2S Missions) in support of The Chosen Ministry, a social ministry for adults with disabilities that Samantha and I attend regularly. This “Christmas Extravaganza” included dinner, music, fellowship time, preaching and even a modern, adorable Christmas play. It truly was an extravaganza, but so much more in terms of their efforts to make everyone feel loved and welcome.

When Samantha and I arrived at the church, we were greeted by at least a half dozen members of the youth group, all at the door with the sole job of welcoming us to the gathering. Samantha shyly made her way into the well-lit church, her eyes sparkling at the sight of the holiday lights. She loves all things Christmas and I could tell she was excited to be at a party!

Samantha and Samantha posing for a quick picture at the end of the evening.

We made our way in the gathering room and were immediately befriended by a young intern named Samantha. She works with Pastor Jeff Montgomery coordinating the work with their youth and EY2SMissions. After just a few moments, it was clear to me that she has a heart to love and connect with people with disabilities. I enjoyed watching her speak with my daughter, unfazed that Samantha was not speaking back but none-the-less making a connection.

The evening continued with dinner served by the joyful and engaged youth. We also listened to the testimony of a friend of ours, Jenny, who has a disability and also a gift for sharing her faith and her story. “How perfect”, I thought, “that this gathering encourages people affected by disability to not only participate, but to lead!”

Jenny and Pastor Jeff

I enjoyed my conversation with the other people at our table. A sweet couple next to us shared that their son has Aspergers. They live close to the church and participate in many of the activities offered. I was thrilled to observe that their 15-year old son had a part in the youth’s entertaining Christmas play. Even though we just met, I could tell these parents were proud of their son for participating on stage. He really did a great job!

As the evening progressed, I realized that Grace Community and their youth were living out their faith and doing everything so right in the way they strive to love and include everyone.  Regardless of the person’s abilities or behaviors, the feeling of acceptance was palatable.  From the warm welcome to the understanding of inclusion, this place is actively building leaders that will one day be engaged, understanding adults. This gives me tremendous hope and it was a blessing to be a part of the evening.

Members of EY2S Missions Youth Group at Grace Community Church

Samantha didn’t want to leave that night, and who could blame her? She felt welcomed, accepted and understood. (And so did I.) As the youth were busy cleaning up and putting up the tables, Samantha and I reluctantly headed out, feeling the warmth of true acceptance. It was an extravagant night, and we feel blessed to have participated. Thank you, Pastor Jeff and the EY2S Missions team. God bless!

 

Essay Contest Blog Series-Blog #1

In preparing for this year’s Gifts of the Heart Gala, I was looking for an opportunity to highlight the voices of those who identify as having a disability. After all, our organization is about inclusion and the most important voice for disability inclusion efforts is (or should be) those who have disabilities themselves. Thus, in addition to our keynote speaker, Lisa Olson, who spoke eloquently about acceptance at the gala, the first Gifts of the Heart Essay Contest was born. 

I really had no idea whether or not anyone would submit an essay but we had a few things going for us. Number one, our good friend and sponsor, John Koehler of Koehler Publishing  offered up the $100 winning prize. Two, I had a vision that our winner and many of the participants would be recognized at our gala on March 11.  

In the end, we had six people enter the contest to share their own ideas of “faith” or what their faith community means to them. Additionally, we had two more writings submitted which we will also include in this mini blog series. 

All the entries were wonderful…beautiful in their own way and exactly what we had hoped for! These first two come from Ashley Bruno and Stephen Cox. 

Enjoy!

Karen Jackson, Executive Director, FIN

“What my Catholic faith means to me” by Ashley Bruno

“It means I like to go to St. Matts for adoration and rosary because I like to grow closer to God and Jesus. I like to go to St. Matts for Mass because I like to have my heart filled with joy. I like to help out at Meal Ministry at Courthouse United Methodist and I like to go to the Diocese Youth Conference in Richmond.”

 

 

 

ALL GOD’S PEOPLE by Stephen Cox

My name is Stephen.  I am 55 years old.  I have a very rare syndrome, Rubenstein-Taybi Syndrome, named for the two doctors who wrote a research paper about it in 1963, the same year I was born.  People with RTS aren’t all alike.  But they often share some of the things that are hard for us.

Part of my special type is that I have trouble with speech.  My brain thinks the words I want to say, but the way my mouth is made is al little different and my brain and mouth don’t always work together.  I like to say short phrases, but I usually speak too fast because I want my words to sound like the words feel in my brain.  You just have to tell me to slow down.  Sometimes you have to ask me to spell words you can’t understand.

I understand most everything I experience.  I can make good decisions and can figure out how to solve problems, but as an adult I am timid about going to new places and taking part in new experiences because it takes longer for my brain to process those unfamiliar things.  Still, I learn new things every day and learning is one of my favorite things.

I have never written an essay before, and when my mom asked me to tell about my church, I asked her to tell you for me.  I know she wrote this for me and she read it to me when she finished.  She even made some changes I asked for.

I go to Eastern Shore Chapel Episcopal Church.  I belong to a Christian family and I was baptized when I was a baby.  I went to Sunday School when I was a little boy.  I worried that my baby sister might have problems like me.  I kept asking “Baby grow up to be a big huge girl?”  It took a while for Mom to understand me, but she promised that our baby would be just fine and that I would keep learning and growing all my life.  I asked the same questions when that same little sister was expecting her babies.

I was older than the other members of my Sunday School Class, but we were friends anyway.  When it was time for my Sunday School class to learn about being grown up members of the church, I wanted to be a member.  I had to go talk to the Bishop, but after he asked me some questions, he said I was as ready to be confirmed as the others in my class.

These days I like to sit in the same church pew every Sunday, but I also like to stand closer to the altar when it is time for communion.  When we say the “Our Father, who art in Heaven” and get to the part about “give us this day our daily bread,” I like to put my hands out just like I do when Father Cameron gives me the bread.  Nobody tells me to sit down and they shake my hand and some of my friends give me a hug.  Everyone always says they miss me when I am sick and they try to understand what I say to them.  Lots of times they do understand!

My mom tells me that the people at church with me are called “parishioners,” but I call them “all God’s people,” because that’s who they really are.

© 2018 Faith Inclusion Network

The Parking Lot

I was excited when Virginia Pilot journalist Denise Watson replied to my email about doing a story on Faith Inclusion Network and our upcoming Gifts of the Heart Gala.  I always love to share about FIN and the work we do. After Denise and I talked on the phone, we decided to meet up at my church, Blessed Sacrament Catholic in Norfolk, VA one weekend before Mass to have a picture taken of my daughter Samantha participating at church, a shining example of inclusion as a person severely affected by autism but very much part of our church family.

I knew our Pastor, Fr. Joe Metzger would be fine with the plan, he has always been supportive of our efforts to include Samantha and the various cameras and reporters in the past coming in to film or take photos.  I should have known it would not be that easy this time around though.  Samantha’s anxiety, built up over the last few weeks for what is as of yet undetermined causes, kicked into high gear and she refused to get out of our van when we got to the church parking lot.

Samantha with Fr. Joe, Pastor at Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church in June, 2017

“Really Samantha?” I thought, “Here we are, trying to share about our wonderful inclusion experience and you won’t even get out of the car!” I dashed inside the church to tell Fr. Joe that Samantha was super stressed and not willing to come inside the church building.  He followed me outside to talk with her himself.  Samantha absolutely adores Fr. Joe so I thought he might convince her to get out of the van.

There in the parking lot we all gathered around Samantha.  Denise, the journalist and Bill, the photographer, could not have been nicer or more understanding. While Denise and I chatted, Bill snapped a few photos of Fr. Joe talking through the window to Samantha.

It wasn’t until the next day that I could organize my thoughts over this whole experience. On the one hand, I was sad and disappointed.  In addition to being worried about what is wrong with Samantha, I felt frustrated. We have worked so hard to get Samantha comfortable at church over the years and it has seemed to pay off. We generally sit together as a family in the sanctuary now and she is usually relaxed and happy, often wanting to linger after Mass. Her current behavior is unusual and a mystery. It is hard on all of us when we do not know what is wrong.

But another part of me realized that I was also very grateful.  I appreciate the people who meet us where we are, even if it is in the church parking lot.  And isn’t that what we really need to do when it comes to our families affected by disability? We need to meet them wherever they are, give support and encouragement through the challenges and let them know that they are not forgotten, even if unusual circumstances make attending church difficult or impossible.

So today I choose to be grateful. I am thankful for all those who love and support Samantha and our family, especially those connected through our church family.

I am sure Samantha will get through this period and we will be back in the pews soon. For now, I pray that this experience is used to touch someone else and be a reminder that sometimes, when you can’t go to church, church has to come to you, even if that is in the parking lot.

Amen.

Karen and Samantha Jackson

What does it take to be a welcoming faith community?

This morning, my daughter Samantha and I attended Second Presbyterian Church, http://www.spcnorfolk.org/ , a small congregation near the Naval Base in Norfolk. I am well acquainted with the church as they generously house Faith Inclusion Network’s office and I count both Pastor Craig Wansink and Assoc. Pastor Catherine Monroe as personal friends. 
This was only the second time I have worshipped with the Second Presbyterian congregation and the first time I have taken Samantha along with me. I was invited to not only share the song “Let’s Share a Journey”,  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-OmcOXxO_s&t=42s but also had the opportunity to sing and play flute along with their small praise band.
I was excited about participating in the worship Sunday morning but also a bit apprehensive. When I woke up Samantha, who has autism and is quite echolalic at times, I said “It’s time to get ready for church.” She spent the next few minutes repeating, “time for church, time for church” and my anxiety started to kick in. I was not sure how to prepare her to go to a different church. Although I had many words explaining how I was going to sing and play flute, I was just not sure if it was sinking in.
Our four-minute drive to Second Pres was over quickly and when I opened the door, Samantha took a moment to process the situation. She realized we were not at her church. For a few seconds, I thought maybe she wouldn’t get out of the van, but then she hopped out and in we headed for a short rehearsal before the service.
As I sang and played in rehearsal, Samantha seemed quite at ease. Quite a few people approached her to say hello. Of course, being non-verbal she didn’t respond, but no one seemed that confused or shocked. I began to relax.
Since I was up front performing most of the service, Samantha sat up in the first pew with the Associate Pastor Catherine Monroe’s’ family Again, any anxiety I had about how Samantha would do in this unfamiliar setting dissolved. I felt like I could relax and enjoy the worship time.
I have always enjoyed hearing Pastor Craig speak and his sermon this morning was no exception. The reading and topic of the day, taken from the Gospel of Luke, was the well-known parable of the Great Banquet. (Luke 14:15-24) In simple terms, Pastor Craig made sure the children up front understood: we shouldn’t just be inviting the wealthy or those who can pay us back. We need to invite the commonly overlooked, commonly excluded, the people on the fringes of society.
The service flew by and I very much enjoyed the chance to share the song “Let’s Share a Journey” as well as a short story about how that song came about.
But the real impact of the experience came at home after I had time to digest the whole morning.
Just a few years ago, I would NEVER had tried to bring Samantha to an unfamiliar church, especially when I couldn’t sit right by her. But with maturity, positive experiences in her own church, (Blessed Sacrament Catholic), and a welcoming atmosphere, she can now adapt to a different church and worship setting. This is so huge and exciting for us!
So why did we feel so welcomed at this church? Here are a few reasons:
1. The friendliness and acceptance of the church’s leadership and members of the congregation. We were intentionally welcomed with both formal introductions from the pulpit and informal greetings from the time we stepped into the church until we left.
2. Accommodations
I needed someone to sit with Samantha while I was up front performing and the Associate Pastor and her family were happy to help. In fact, Catherine’s response when I asked her was an enthusiastic, “Absolutely, thanks for asking!”. This meant a lot because she understood that there was a possibility that some autistic behaviors could kick in and things could not go well, but she wanted to help anyway.

3. Acknowledgement of importance of inclusion
I realize most people are not affected by disability in a personal way. Hearing a message of inclusion from the Pastor is extremely welcoming to people and families affected by disability.

Does this church have a disability ministry or program? No, and I don’t think that this is necessarily a prerequisite to being welcoming, even to people affected by disability, (although disability ministries can bring even more awareness and support to families affected by disability and are wonderful parts of many faith communities). What is a requirement, however, is leadership committed to the call of acceptance and members of a congregation open to embracing people that are different. It takes love and understanding and an inclusive attitude.

Thank you to Second Presbyterian Church and to all who are working diligently in their own houses of worship to be more inclusive and welcoming. God Bless.

 

 

 

 

Beauty Perseveres

As we come to the end of Autism Awareness month 2017, I would like to thank the contributors to our Autism Moms and Dads Blog Interview Series for sharing a bit about their lives in the world of Autism.  It has been particularly interesting to get the Dad’s perspective this year in addition to the Moms. I have also enjoyed the opportunity to re-connect with both local and national friends and make some new FIN friends along the way. Many thanks to those that interviewed: David Rizzo, dad to Danielle from New Jersey, Ruth and Rick Robins, parents of Tripp in Virginia, Tim Craig, dad to Clinton, from New Jersey, Janet Shouse, mom to Evan Shouse from Tennessee and Michael Hoggatt, dad to Summer from California. You are all an inspiration to me and it was a pleasure to “meet” you and your children through these interviews. 

Blessings to all those out there that love and care for people affected by autism. You are doing a great job!-K. Jackson

Beauty Perseveres

As I sat on my front porch, on a lovely late-April morning, a sweet little flower caught my eye. Not that flowers are unusual in the spring time, especially in Virginia, but this one seemed to be growing right through our tiled front porch! And the words “beauty perseveres” invaded my mind.

The writer in me jumped at the chance to use this unusual bloom as a symbol of the strong, determined and undefeatable autism moms, dads and children that I have met on my own parenting journey. Persons who have autism and parents and caregivers who, despite challenging behaviors, multiple medical needs, serious communication and sensory challenges and more, do persevere. They persevere even when it seems impossible to do so. They persevere through the tiled foundations of our society’s misunderstanding of autism, through uniformed attitudes and the unrelenting hyper-vigilance required of some moms and dads of children with autism. They persevere because they love their children.

Recently, our family has faced quite a few challenges; from our daughter’s six day hospitalization in the Intensive Care Unit of our local Children’s hospital to last summer, when we were dealing with some extremely challenging behaviors related to an anxiety disorder, (and let’s not forget the recent aggravating car accident that required a new vehicle), it has been a whirlwind. Yet through God’s grace and a generous dose of His strength, we have persevered and come out on the other side, seeing the beauty in our daughter, in our lives and in our amazing God.

“…And we rejoice in the hope of the glory of God. Not only so, but we rejoice in our suffering, because we know that suffering produces perseverance, perseverance character and character, hope. And hope does not disappoint us, because God has poured out his love into our hearts…” Romans 5:2-5

Most Christians, when presented with the term, “perseverance” would go right to the above scripture in Romans. “Suffering produces perseverance” we are taught. But the most important part of these verses to me is not that we suffer (because everyone suffers, whether or not they are affected by any kind of disability) but that through suffering we eventually get to hope.  This is the beauty I see out of our perseverance; a hope that sustains, that draws others to God and helps us appreciate the gifts that our beautiful children with autism bring into our lives.

Just as that flower grows through the seemingly impossible place on my front porch, I pray that all of those affected by autism persevere through the difficult challenges that ASD can sometimes bring and experience the beauty and hope of God’s love for us all.

Thanks be to God.