Autism Moms and Dads Blog Series Interview#1-2017

A big FIN welcome to Mr. Michael J. Hoggatt, a professor at Saddleback College in Mission Viejo, CA in the Disabled Students Programs and Services Program. In our first interview of the second annual Autism Moms and Dads Blog Series to celebrate Autism Awareness this April, Michael shares about his beautiful daughter, Summer.  Thank you for your contribution Mr. Hoggatt and especially for giving us a dad’s point of view.

Interview #1 with Mr. Michael Hoggatt

  • Question: How old was your child when they were diagnosed with autism? Can you share how you felt when you received that diagnosis?
  • Michael: Summer carried a number of diagnoses up until age 6 or 7, including MR. At age 6 or 7 Special Education and local Developmental Services (Regional Center in California) re-diagnosed her as both IDD and ASD.  My wife and I thought the diagnoses was appropriate.

Summer and her Mom

We met Summer at age 3 ½ after she had lived her entire life in the foster care system. We knew she had significant delays and a history of abuse, so 3 -3 ½ years after meeting her, we were aware of her needs regardless of the label. However, we also knew that some labels were easier to wrap services around, so there never any grief or significant concern over receiving a diagnosis of ASD.

  • Question: What is currently your biggest challenge as an autism dad?
  • MichaelBeing marginalized as a dad. Too often moms are contacted by the school or the people Summer is currently working with.  I go to every IEP and every meeting about her and my wife and I are a team. This seems to be a foreign concept to many of the ABA and Special Education administrators. It is difficult to explain that in both the secular and sacred realms, that I probably spend more 1:1 time with my daughter than anyone else (including her time with my wife).

Balancing the need to create a typical environment while responding to both her developmental as well as attachment needs is another challenge.

  • Question: What is currently your greatest joy as an autism dad?

  • Michael: Every day there is a difficulty with Summer whether it is related to her hygiene, her personal space, or her aggression. Yet, it is so far outweighed by her genuine kindness and love. Watching her make progress in a skill or watching her discover something new in the world. Right now our thing is sitting next to each other holding hands while we watch the Cooking Channel.  
  • Question: Has autism affected your faith? If yes, how so?
  • Michael: I am closer to God but further away from my peers.  I have seen how God has worked in our lives. I have seen God work in Summer’s life. Despite living 3 ½ years in 9 different placements full of abuses and neglect, and despite losing a kidney to advanced, near terminal, kidney cancer at age 5, she is still hopeful. She is still able to show me God’s grace on a daily basis.  However, while we are able to attend our corporate worship service, we have never been able to participate in a small group do to the need for one of us monitor her since there is no “buddy,” or 1:1, outside of Sunday mornings.  
  • Question: Is there anything else you would like to share about being an autism dad?
  • Michael: Looking back on the challenges associated with fostering/adopting a girl with her diagnoses and challenges (including the loss of relationships, the emotional strain, the health scares, and more) I know that I am closer to God, I am closer to my wife, I am a better father to her and her brother (Elijah age 6), and a better version of me because she is in my life. As such, knowing what I know now, not only would we do it all again, we probably would have tried to do it sooner.          

 

 

If you are interested in reading more from Mr. Hoggatt, he contributed to the book, Another Kind of Courage: God’s Design for Fathers of Families Affected by Disability by Dough Mazza and Steve Bundy, published by Joni and Friends: Agoura Hills, CA 2013.