Essay Contest Blog Series-Blog #1

In preparing for this year’s Gifts of the Heart Gala, I was looking for an opportunity to highlight the voices of those who identify as having a disability. After all, our organization is about inclusion and the most important voice for disability inclusion efforts is (or should be) those who have disabilities themselves. Thus, in addition to our keynote speaker, Lisa Olson, who spoke eloquently about acceptance at the gala, the first Gifts of the Heart Essay Contest was born. 

I really had no idea whether or not anyone would submit an essay but we had a few things going for us. Number one, our good friend and sponsor, John Koehler of Koehler Publishing  offered up the $100 winning prize. Two, I had a vision that our winner and many of the participants would be recognized at our gala on March 11.  

In the end, we had six people enter the contest to share their own ideas of “faith” or what their faith community means to them. Additionally, we had two more writings submitted which we will also include in this mini blog series. 

All the entries were wonderful…beautiful in their own way and exactly what we had hoped for! These first two come from Ashley Bruno and Stephen Cox. 

Enjoy!

Karen Jackson, Executive Director, FIN

“What my Catholic faith means to me” by Ashley Bruno

“It means I like to go to St. Matts for adoration and rosary because I like to grow closer to God and Jesus. I like to go to St. Matts for Mass because I like to have my heart filled with joy. I like to help out at Meal Ministry at Courthouse United Methodist and I like to go to the Diocese Youth Conference in Richmond.”

 

 

 

ALL GOD’S PEOPLE by Stephen Cox

My name is Stephen.  I am 55 years old.  I have a very rare syndrome, Rubenstein-Taybi Syndrome, named for the two doctors who wrote a research paper about it in 1963, the same year I was born.  People with RTS aren’t all alike.  But they often share some of the things that are hard for us.

Part of my special type is that I have trouble with speech.  My brain thinks the words I want to say, but the way my mouth is made is al little different and my brain and mouth don’t always work together.  I like to say short phrases, but I usually speak too fast because I want my words to sound like the words feel in my brain.  You just have to tell me to slow down.  Sometimes you have to ask me to spell words you can’t understand.

I understand most everything I experience.  I can make good decisions and can figure out how to solve problems, but as an adult I am timid about going to new places and taking part in new experiences because it takes longer for my brain to process those unfamiliar things.  Still, I learn new things every day and learning is one of my favorite things.

I have never written an essay before, and when my mom asked me to tell about my church, I asked her to tell you for me.  I know she wrote this for me and she read it to me when she finished.  She even made some changes I asked for.

I go to Eastern Shore Chapel Episcopal Church.  I belong to a Christian family and I was baptized when I was a baby.  I went to Sunday School when I was a little boy.  I worried that my baby sister might have problems like me.  I kept asking “Baby grow up to be a big huge girl?”  It took a while for Mom to understand me, but she promised that our baby would be just fine and that I would keep learning and growing all my life.  I asked the same questions when that same little sister was expecting her babies.

I was older than the other members of my Sunday School Class, but we were friends anyway.  When it was time for my Sunday School class to learn about being grown up members of the church, I wanted to be a member.  I had to go talk to the Bishop, but after he asked me some questions, he said I was as ready to be confirmed as the others in my class.

These days I like to sit in the same church pew every Sunday, but I also like to stand closer to the altar when it is time for communion.  When we say the “Our Father, who art in Heaven” and get to the part about “give us this day our daily bread,” I like to put my hands out just like I do when Father Cameron gives me the bread.  Nobody tells me to sit down and they shake my hand and some of my friends give me a hug.  Everyone always says they miss me when I am sick and they try to understand what I say to them.  Lots of times they do understand!

My mom tells me that the people at church with me are called “parishioners,” but I call them “all God’s people,” because that’s who they really are.

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