Autism Moms and Dads Blog Series-Interview #5

 

I “met” Dave a few years ago by phone and was struck by the similarities of our parenting experience, having daughters very close in age.  My family is also Catholic and has worked hard to include our daughter into the life of our local parish and teach her about the Catholic faith. After talking with Dave, I once again realized how important connecting with other parents can be, even if they are in another part of the country.  If you would like to keep up with Dave and his beautiful daughter, Danielle, take a look at their Facebook page, Autism with the Rizzos at https://www.facebook.com/Autism-With-The-Rizzos-281489198616138/

Also, I highly recommend  David’s book,  Faith, Family and Children with Special Needs; Spiritually Able http://www.loyolapress.com/products/books/family-life-and-parenting/faith-family-and-children-with-special-needs and the The Adaptive First Eucharist Preparation Kit https://www.loyolapress.com/products/special-needs/adaptive-learning/adaptive-first-eucharist-preparation-kit , which he helped develop. Both of these are wonderful resources for helping to teach the Catholic faith to persons who have autism.

Interview #5 Dave Rizzo

 

Question: How old was your child when they were diagnosed with autism? Can you share how you felt when you received that diagnosis?

Dave: Danielle was four years old when she was diagnosed with autism.  My wife and I knew something was up before this and we feared it was autism, but the formal diagnosis from a doctor didn’t come till Danielle was four.  The diagnostic process seemed endless. There were surveys we had to fill out, early intervention sessions, meetings with doctors and therapists.  When the formal diagnosis did come I felt a combination of intense dread and sadness, coupled with relief that at last I knew for sure what was going on with my daughter. The sadness came from the realization that the life I had imagined for her up to this point would not be the life she would lead, things like that I would never walk her down the aisle at her wedding, or that she would not go to college or lead an independent life. 

Question: How has living with autism affected your family? (immediate or extended)

Dave: It affected my family in a big way.  Raising a child with autism leads to a fundamental shift in family dynamics.  We had to arrange our family life around keeping Danielle safe, providing therapies, helping her with everything.  We had to give most of our time to Danielle and this sometimes meant not giving equal time to our three other children. I felt very isolated in those early years.  It took a while for us all to learn how we could be a family of a child with autism and balance all the competing demands.  Eventually we learned how to do this better.

 QuestionWhat is currently your biggest challenge as an autism dad?

Dave: We just went through the process of attaining guardianship for Danielle, who turned 18 last autumn.  It was very difficult hearing her declared a mentally incapacitated individual.  We don’t think of her that way.  We think of all the marvelous things she has learned to do, all her accomplishments, the way she has brought joy into our lives and in the lives of others.  It’s also still a challenge to see other children her age meeting milestones and typical rites of passage like learning how to drive.

 Question: What is currently your greatest joy as an autism dad?

Dave: Seeing how Danielle has grown into a fun loving person, who continues to spread joy to those she meets.  For me, I experience a special joy when I see Danielle at Mass participating with reverence, folding her hands in prayer, reaching out during the sign of peace, kneeling in prayer after receiving holy communion. 

 Question: Has autism affected your faith? If yes, how so?

Dave: Having a child with autism forced me to grapple with my faith and turn toward God in prayer and sacrament.  My faith became much more visual and experiential, as I tried to connect with both God and my daughter.  I have learned that the life I imagined was not exactly the life God had in store for me.  But I am trying to discover in my life that the action of God is unfolding the way it should, that the life God has in store for me and my family is a good life.

 Question: Is there anything else you would like to share about being an autism dad?

Dave: Yes.  I want people to know that it is a life changing experience, and a roller coaster of a ride.  As the father of a now young adult with autism I have learned to look at the world a little differently.  I make a lot of mistakes along the way, and it is often very hard. However, mostly things are good.  There is happiness, humor, sadness, exasperation, compassion, love, and all the emotions you can possibly imagine, but life is about all of these feelings, and always has been.